Attending

The City

Turin is the administrative center of Piedmont and is the fourth larger city in Italy as regards population (around 900.000). It is also one of the main city in the industrial triangle that as made the nord-west of Italy an economically developed area.

The city covers a large area and has a grid layout the regularity of the streets is impressive when viewed from above. The heart the Turin is Piazza Castello which is overlooked by Palazzo Madama e Palazzo Reale. Leading out of the square are via Po, which runs to the east and the banks of the river, and via Roma, which runs south to piazza San Carlo passing by Turin's main museums. Via Garibaldi originally roman leads directly west into the city and boasts numerous churches as more squares of particular interest. At the edge of Historic center are the two railway stations Porta Nuova and Porta Susa.

 

Aula Magna - Cavallerizza reale

The Cavallerizza Reale, originally the Royal Stables in the 17th century, became a Unesco World Heritage Site in 1997 as part of the Residence of the House of Savoy. The building was designed in 1740 by the First Architect Regio Benedetto Alfieri to carry out the equestrian exercises. It turns out to be a large space in austere baroque style.
Surviving a series of accidents throughout the years, today Cavallerizza Reale is a cultural centre run by a group of young locals. Together with cultural and sporting activities, many concerts are held. The aula magna of Cavallerizza Reale is located in the center of Turin (Via Giuseppe Verdi 9). You can reach it by foot from Porta Nuova station, Vittorio Veneto square or Castello square. Alternatively you can take the bus 56/55 or the tram 13 from Porta Susa station (Direction: city center, stop: 474 - Rossini).

 

Travel to Turin

By air - Sandro Pertini Airport

Turin's "Sandro Pertini" Airport is 16 kilometers northwest of the town center and provides direct connections with all major European cities and hubs. Intercontinental connections to/from Turin are easily guaranteed especially through Frankfurt, Munich, Paris and Rome. From the airport, the city center can be reached by bustaxi or trainBeware that the train stops at the GTT Dora Railway Station which is not in the city center and is connected to the city centre by public transport.

 

By rail

Turin has two main railway stations, Porta Susa and Porta Nuova, with most trains stopping at both. The city is very well linked both to the Italian railway system and to that of neighboring countries. High-speed trains connect Turin with all the major Italian cities (Turin-Rome takes approximately 5 hours).

  • Trenitalia Italian railways, local and high-speed trains
  • Italo Italian railways, mostly high-speed trains
  • SNCF French railways, direct connections between Turin and Grenoble, Lyon and Paris
  • SBB Swiss railways, connections with Switzerland

 

Local transportation

Turin is served by an effective public transportation system comprising buses, shuttles, trams and a fully automated subway line. Interconnections are guaranteed with all the railway stations and with Turin’s Airport.

There are some car sharing services available, but using the car in Turin is not recommended, it can be stressful and parking can be difficult.

The bike is a great way of exploring the city and its surroundings, although bikers should stay alert and away from the heavily trafficked roads. There is a bike sharing service which however requires a subscription. More recently, the well-known free floating bike sharing services Mobike and oBike have been activated in Turin. More information can be found on the web pages of these services as well as on this (automatically translated) page of Torino Turismo.

Generally Turin can be considered a safe city, but watch out for pickpockets especially on local transports.